MAPP/NIDIS/CNAP Webinar: California Drought 2011-2017: A Story About the Historic Drought

Event date: 5/29/2018 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM Export event

California's Folsom Reservoir in 2014 (left) and 2017 (right).
Image Credit: Paul Hames (l) and Kelly M. Grow (r), California Department of Water Resources. Image Source.

The NOAA CPO Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) program co-hosting a webinar with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) program on the topic California Drought 2011-2017: A Story About the Historic Drought on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, 2- 3 p.m. ET.

This webinar will present a recently-released story map developed by the MAPP and NIDIS programs with NCEI on the 2011-2017 California Drought. Speakers will discuss how the drought evolved, what scientists understand about the drought, and scientific efforts to monitor and predict it. This presentation is taking place during a regularly-scheduled drought outlook hosted by the California-Nevada Climate Applications Program.

The beginning of the webinar will feature an update from Dan McEvoy (WRCC, DRI) on current drought conditions and the outlook for drought in the California-Nevada region. The second part of the webinar will focus on the Story Map. Ali Stevens led creation of the story map with Amanda Sheffield. Ali and Amanda will guide webinar attendees through the story map with Michelle L'Heureux, Dennis Lettenmaier, and Marty Hoerling joining to provide perspective and discuss the science.

Date/Time Title & Presenters

May 29, 2018
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET

 

California Drought 2011-2017: A Story About the Historic Drought

Speakers and Topics

Amanda Sheffield (NOAA NIDIS) 

Alison Stevens (NOAA MAPP Program) 

Michelle L'Heureux (NOAA Climate Prediction Center)

Dennis Lettenmaier (UCLA, CNAP) 

Marty Hoerling (NOAA Earth Systems Research Lab) 

 

Watch Webcast

 

Print

x

ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2017, the United States experienced a record-tying 16 climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 362 lives, and had significant economic effects on the areas impacted, costing more than $306 billion. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910