NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
Social Science Network Webinar Series

A team of social scientists from across three programs in OAR – the National Sea Grant College Program, the Climate Program Office, and the Office of Weather and Air Quality – are banding together to launch a new initiative aimed at enhancing the social science research capabilities and coordination across NOAA Research (OAR) units. These calls will be a complement to a new Social Science Learning Series NOAA will be launching next spring, offering a community of practice specifically for researchers. This effort is going to start small, and we hope you can join us in it.

Our team plans to organize webinar/teleconferences once per quarter with the following objectives:

  • Share applied social science research findings from our labs, cooperative institutes, Sea Grant and Climate programs, competitive research programs, and RISA networks;
  • Share best practices for supporting and conducting research at the physical-social science interface

In so doing, we envision that this effort could achieve the following objectives:

  • Enhance the coordination of research between those with similar research interests and among those who are working cross NOAA Research units in similar regions;
  • Help research entities with interests in social science, but who are not yet involved, to learn how they can get more involved.
The meetings will be facilitated via GoToWebinar, and should last about an hour each.

Past Webinars:

1. Climate change beliefs and adaptation attitudes: lessons from the more-or-less real world
December 1, 2016
Speaker: Stuart Carlton, Texas Sea Grant

2. Warnings and Extreme Weather Events
April 19, 2017
Speaker 1: Rachel Hogan-Carr, Nature-Nurture Center
Speaker 2: Michael Egnoto, University of Maryland

3. Developing and Using Vulnerability Assessments
September 20, 2017
Speaker 1: Kirstin Dow, University of South Carolina
Speaker 2: Jenna Jorns, University of Michigan


ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

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